Soccer vs. Basketball

Michigan Vs. Indiana

Michigan Vs. Indiana (MY PHOTO)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A._Bartlett_Giamatti

Giamatti

This fall I attended two sporting events. Men’s Soccer and Men’s basketball. The soccer game I attended was a very important one. It was against Indiana. In the first half of the game we were doing so good. We were playing with such intensity and we were playing as a team, but once we entered the second half we fell apart.

The second half of the game was a struggle. Not only did the offense and defense fall apart, the Michigan fans fell apart as well. Once Indiana scored a goal the Michigan fans automatically got discouraged and stopped cheering for Michigan. They just gave up. They started yelling at the coach and booing the players. The expected happened as a result as that. The team became discouraged and stop playing with  heart, like they started. This reminded me of what was mentioned in Giamatti’s Take Time For Paradisehow spectators watch because they want to be the athlete “…and to bound them in time or by rules or boundaries in a green enclosure surrounded by an amphitheater or at least a gallery is to replicate the arena of humankind ‘s highest aspiration”. It is such a pity that they turn on their own players because of that though, but the basketball game I attended was a whole different story.

The Men’s basketball game I attended was against Wayne State. It was an exhibition game, and after watching, I understood why. This game was amazing. Michigan continued their 30 plus point lead almost the entire game. The fans were very supportive and very enthusiastic throughout the entire game, which was the complete opposite behavior of the fans from the soccer game. I feel as though no matter if the team you are supporting is winning or losing you should support them. There should be no booing or disrespecting the coach.

Although the games are different, the fans still behave the same, When the soccer team was doing well in the first quarter they cheered and supported the team, just as the fans did during the basketball game.

Crisler Arena

Crisler Arena (MY PHOTO)

The athletes participating in these games are expected to do a lot. They are expected to win and listen to the spectators (the people who aren’t playing) boo them and then go to the locker room and listen to the coaching staff yell at them too. That is a lot of pressure to put on people that are just playing a sport and doing what they love. I feel like if the spectators were put in the athletes positions they wouldn’t appreciate being treated like that. To be critiqued on just doing something you love and enjoy is horrible. I know I would be very upset. I just think people really need to re-evaluate their actions and how they respond to things, especially things they know they are incapable of performing themselves.

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2 thoughts on “Soccer vs. Basketball

  1. I also attended the Michigan vs. Indiana soccer game, and I see your point. The fans definitely gave up on the team fairly easily, and made it very hard for the players to remain enthusiastic. I think your comparison to Giamatti is very accurate, and there are a lot of unfair pressures put on athletes every day by fans and coaches alike. It is definitely much easier to support a team when they are winning, as we have seen with the lack of support for the football team this season when they struggled.

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  2. Hi snedwards,

    I like your comparison to Giamatti as well. However, I think our fans will behave differently when our team is trailing in a soccer game and a basketball or a football game. Soccer is apparently not an American sport, and the fact that it is so difficult scoring a goal in a soccer game makes fans feel greatly discouraged when our team is trailing. On the other hand, in a Michigan basketball and a football game, fans usually still remain enthusiastic even when wolverines are trailing. This is not only because it is easier to turn around in these games, but also because fans have more passion on these authentic American sports.

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